You have thirty minutes left to finish your critical analysis writing, but you start to question everything you’ve written. Don’t freak out! This first-aid guide is here to help you with your last-minute writing problems.

Emergency 1: Burns: You are exposed to new perspectives and changed your mind about the issue. But sadly you don’t have the time to rewrite it.

What you should do:

  • Stop thinking about the alternatives and convince yourself what you had written.
  • Think back to your original reasoning. What was convincing about your original opinion?
  • What new information or perspective attracted you to another argument?
  • Find the difference in perspectives between the two arguments.
  • Limit your argument/Put restrictions to your old perspective. No argument is wrong. It is a matter whether they are put in the right contexts. Make sure your old argument is put into the most applicable perspective so that it is more convincing than other alternatives.
  • Maybe add another compromise paragraph to acknowledge other possibilities to show that you have given it a thorough consideration.

Emergency 2: Electrolyte Imbalance: You are running out of supporting evidence.

What you should do:

  • Read the material closely and think over every point that the author makes.
  • Of course, not every idea can be used to your advantages but a lot of them can be used as counterarguments, counterexamples, possible new evidence…Not everything is straightforward. Twist them and tie them to your argument. Your writing could be more convincing and thought-provoking if you can use the author’s word against himself.

Doctors’ Orders:

  • “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” —Anton Chekhov

Emergency 3:  Fainting, the brain doesn’t receive enough blood supply: You are worried that your writing may lack sophistication.

What you should do:

  • If you have a clear sense that your work is lacking sophistication, then you are already on a good track. Go over your thought process, consider the factors that have shaped your thinking. Why have you focused on a particular thing or taken a certain perspective?
  • Often your stand on a particular issue ties back to your deeper beliefs. Dig into these beliefs that may add depth and perspectives into your argument.

Doctors’ Orders:

  • “Every Secret of a writer’s soul, every experience of his life, every quality of his mind is written large in his works”.  — Virginia Woolf

Emergency 4: Cut and scrapes, could be minor: You’ve exceeded the required word count but you think you need more words to feel secure.

What you should do:

  • Just stop worrying about the word count. Good work is not qualified by the number of words.

Could be major: You are definitely not meeting the minimum word count.

What you should do:

  • Refer to Emergency 2 and 3.
  • If you sincerely believe that Emergency 2 and 3 don’t apply to your situation, then screw the word count requirement. You are better than those who need a minimum word count.

Doctors’ Orders:

  • “The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.” — Thomas Jefferson

Emergency 5: Admission to ICU…this is serious: Based on your estimation, you will not be able to finish the writing on time unless you make other sacrifices (sleeping time, other assignments).

What you should do:

  • Weigh your options and make the choice. As important as your writing, there may be other aspects of life that you need to allocate your time and energy to.

Worst case: No matter what you do, you will not be able to finish on time. We are very sorry to inform you that despite our best effort to save your writing, it has passed away late in the evening. It is in a better place now.

Disclaimer:

This is information is not intended as professional writing advice. Don’t use this information to develop a writing plan when you do have enough time. If you are in a life-threatening situation, please seek professional assistance.