ABOUT

mire

/ˈmī(ə)r/
noun

  1. a stretch of swampy or boggy ground.
  2. a situation or state of difficulty, distress, or embarrassment from which it is hard to extricate oneself.

“Into the mire!”
more words: quagmire, admire, bemire
synonyms: mess, difficulty, plight, predicament, tight spot, trouble, quandary, muddle

The Mire, founded by Indian Springs students and faculty, publishes thought-provoking literature aimed towards young adults. Issued annually, The Mire aims to inspire through works that provide fresh perspectives, emotional depth, and most importantly, heart. Curated for deep thinkers, quirky be-ers, and curious do-ers —by that we mean students—The Mire allows space to develop and question through the stories we share. Named for both our Indian Springs swampy landscape and the collective feeling of what it means to be a young adult today, The Mire believes ultimately in the transformational power of narrative. Through fiction, nonfiction, poetry, humor, art and photography, the way we see and experience the world has the potential to move us, emotionally taking us out of the mires in which we find ourselves stuck.

Indian Springs School was founded in 1952. Though there hasn’t always been a literary magazine on campus, literature and writing have always been a part of student life. The last literary magazine, Ajna, began in late 1980s and published its last issue in 2009. Previous student participants include acclaimed authors Daniel Alarcón and John Green. As we look to relaunch this part of our literary history, The Mire hopes to continue the tradition of bringing stories to our students but also to those beyond our campus gates. This time around, our focus is on an audience of young adults worldwide. We hope that they find meaning in our stories. We hopethey let these words sink in.

Because that’s what happens in a swamp. Sometimes you sink. But we hope that these stories will remind you that sometimes sinking is necessary. That sometimes playing in the mud is fun. That sometimes being stuck or stagnate means time to grow and time to learn. Barbara Hurd, in her book on Stirring the Mud: On Swamps, Bogs, and Human Imagination writes that in the swamps, in the mires: “there is room for the thought not fully formed to stretch, roll over, poke its eyes above water.”

The Mire is waiting for your thoughts. We want to see them stretch. We want to watch them roll over and dare to poke their eyes above water.

And then watch them grow.

Featured image by Matti Rose Lawrence